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Meet the Actors

The Reluctant Ressurection of Sherlock Homes

directed by: Dennis Curley


Character: Desmond Westhaven

Actor: Ryk Simpson


WHAT WAS THE FIRST PLAY YOU WERE IN, AND WHAT ROLE?
RYK SIMPSON: First role was in Grade 6. I played Scrooge in A Christmas Carol. I've been fortunate enough to play in a number of musicals, comedies, and dramas since then as well as sketch and Improv comedy. My first role with Milton Players was David Stafford in My Darling Judith.
WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE ROLE YOU'VE PLAYED?
RS: My favourite role was Hossler in Book Club by Kristen Da Silva. He was a loud, free, and loving super-geek.
WHAT IS YOUR DREAM ROLE TO PLAY, OR PRODUCTION TO BE IN?
RS: My dream production is Noises Off. I saw the movie when I was younger and I fell in love with theatre. My dream role is Willy Loman in Death of a Salesman.
WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE PART OF BEING INVOLVED WITH THIS SHOW?
RS: My favourite part of being in this show is the camaraderie with cast and crew. It's an incredibly fun and rewarding process with amazingly talented and supportive people.
WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE FOOD?
RS: Favourite food is Dol Sot Bibimbap. It is a Korean dish - rice, vegetables, egg, protein, and hot sauce served in a hot stone bowl. Delicious!!
IN ONE SENTENCE, WHY SHOULD PEOPLE BUY TICKETS TO THIS SHOW?
RS: Live theatre is an incredible experience. Milton Players puts on professional quality productions for community theatre prices. This show in particular has comedy, drama, and a number of unique extras that set it apart from typical productions. It's a great night out! So please come and see the show! Please! That was more than one sentence. Please!

Meet the Actors

The Reluctant Ressurection of Sherlock Homes

directed by: Dennis Curley


Character: Sherlock Holmes

Actor: Sean Carsley


WHAT WAS THE FIRST PLAY YOU WERE IN, AND WHAT ROLE?
SEAN CARSLEY: My first play was Milton Players production of Neil Simon's RUMORS. I was Senator Glenn Cooper
WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE ROLE YOU'VE PLAYED?
SC: Sherlock Holmes is my favourite
WHAT IS YOUR DREAM ROLE TO PLAY, OR PRODUCTION TO BE IN?
SC: "Stones in His Pockets" by Marie Jones is my favorite play. A challenging, tragicomedy that is brilliant and engaging.
WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE PART OF BEING INVOLVED WITH THIS SHOW?
SC: Interaction with so many like-minded people is the best thing about any production
WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE FOOD?
SC: Favourite food is steak scallops and shrimp (surf n turf). Unless you're a vegan reading this. In which case spinach salad mushroom and vinaigrette.
IN ONE SENTENCE, WHY SHOULD PEOPLE BUY TICKETS TO THIS SHOW.
SC: Buy tickets to the show because Milton Players pays attention to detail and our cast and crew is a great team

Meet the Actors

The Reluctant Ressurection of Sherlock Homes

directed by: Dennis Curley


Character: Conan Doyle

Actor: Michael Chew


WHAT WAS THE FIRST PLAY YOU WERE IN, AND WHAT ROLE?
MICHAEL CHEW: I can't remember the name of the play but it was in Grade 2 and I was Santa Claus. I spent the whole show stuck in the chimney because I had too many cookies in my pocket.
WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE ROLE YOU'VE PLAYED?
MC: My favourite role so far has been Lenny Ganz from Neil Simon's 'Rumors' because he was just sooooo uptight. Doyle has been the hardest so far.

WHAT IS YOUR DREAM ROLE TO PLAY, OR PRODUCTION TO BE IN?
MC: My first pick would be Pontius Pilot in 'Jesus Christ Superstar'. It would be nice to get cast against type (physically). Also, if I could play the Devil in Randy Newman's version of 'Faust' I'd jump at it.
WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE PART OF BEING INVOLVED WITH THIS SHOW?
MC: This is an outstanding cast but probably the biggest excitement is working with Dennis Curley as the Director again and working with Sean Carsley (who plays Sherlock Holmes) who I've known for over 35 years. Having grown up together I feel it gives us an edge and a sense of safety when approaching Holmes and Doyle.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE FOOD?
MC: Spaghetti and meatballs.....or bacon.....or shrimp.
IN ONE SENTENCE, WHY SHOULD PEOPLE BUY TICKETS TO THIS SHOW.
MC: People need to come see this show because director Dennis Curley and the cast have strived for excellence and have gone far outside the box. People will be amazed at some of the things they're going to see. It's going to be an event, an experience. Sorry, that's 3 sentences.

Who Are We ?

(...and why we have to do what we do)



If you were to stop the average person on the street and ask them why someone would get involved in community theatre, whether it’s on stage or behind the scenes, the answer you will invariably get is “...because they crave the attention”.
While there may be an element of truth to this (seriously, who doesn’t love praise and applause) there is more to it... so much more. Every laugh, every tear, every gasp, every emotion elicited from an audience member is an affirmation that we made the right choice, that no matter what else is happening in our lives, we took a chance and it was a chance well taken.

So who are we?
We are everyone. We are all walks of life. Our stage experience spans former professionals to first time performers. We are entrepreneurs, wait-staff and sales people. We are doctors, lawyers, software engineers, nurses, managers and ex military. Our political beliefs go from the extreme right to the extreme left. Our income status’ range from very comfortable to barely able to pay our bills. Our religious affiliations cover every belief structure there is. We are Muslims and Jews and Christians and Atheists. We are parents... and not. We lose jobs, we have health issues, we suffer the general trauma that is incorporated in a daily life. We thrive and celebrate and love.

...and why do we do this?

Because we are driven to create something as a collective. Look at who we are and then go turn on a television or surf the internet for a little while. On paper, there is no way that we should be able to work together towards a common goal and yet that is what we do. Not only that, but we do it with relish and thrive in each other’s company. Personally, I try to avoid the news because all it does is tell me, on a daily basis, that what we are able to attain is unattainable.
The world can be a pretty intense place if you dwell on it, but you don’t need to worry about that here. The bond that the theatre brings transcends every other difference we may have and that bond is impossible to break. It creates an environment that accepts. Differences get checked at the door. We are all in it together. We thrive as a group and fail as a group. We take risks and we support each other in the risks taken, hoping that they are the right ones. We spend two and a half months together, three nights a week, creating something from nothing (for the judgement of others, to either enjoy or eviscerate) and then we look forward to the next time we get to start it all over again.

Ohhh...hey...We ain’t perfect. We argue and bicker and fight... but then, quickly, we laugh at our own stupidity and pettiness and hug it out or go grab a beer.

That’s why we do this and the rush we get from what we are able to achieve defies description.

Who are we?

We’re the Milton Players Theatre Group... and we welcome you to come and be a part of this.

Interview with Ken Ludwig

A CONVERSATION WITH KEN LUDWIG

by: Simon Chang

Ken Ludwig

Ken Ludwig is a very busy man. When The Milton Players first approached the award-winning playwright about an interview, Ludwig was in the midst of closing his play Baskerville, a world premiere co-production between the McCarter Theatre Center in Princeton, NJ and Arena Stage in Washington D.C. The coming months looked equally packed, as Ludwig revealed that the Cleveland Play House’s 100th anniversary season would include his newest show A Comedy of Tenors, sequel to the Andrew Lloyd Webber-produced Broadway hit Lend Me a Tenor.

In-between all that, Ludwig also keeps busy in more conventional ways, such as the responsibilities of being a parent: “I have to pick my son up from school,” Ludwig apologizes, asking to push out our scheduled call by a few minutes. It’s an easily accommodated request, and as Ken Ludwig finds himself moving on to his next appointment a half hour later, the Milton Players have been treated to an insightful look into playwriting by the Moon Over Buffalo author.

Milton Players: Where does the name Moon Over Buffalo originate from? What [does] that ultimately reference in the show?

Ken Ludwig: I’ve just heard that question recently. In the 1930s or 40s, there was a famous song (and a famous movie) that were known for their sense of romance called Moon Over Miami. So the notion was that Buffalo, New York is the dregs of the earth, forgive me New York citizens of Buffalo (laughs), and that this couple who were once great have been reduced to playing Private Lives and Cyrano de Bergerac. It’s meant to be ironic, and it was a title I came up with and it stuck, so I just left it at that.

MP: Moon Over Buffalo is the textbook definition of a farce; the mistaken identities, slamming the doors, all the plot twists. What in your opinion is the secret to writing a good farce?

Read more: Interview with Ken Ludwig

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